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Slavery Remembrance Day 2015

Posted on Tuesday 30th June 2015
Ndaba Mandela

Nelson Mandela’s grandson, Ndaba Mandela, to deliver memorial lecture

Ndaba Mandela, grandson of the beloved and iconic Nelson Mandela, has accepted an invitation to deliver the Dorothy Kuya Slavery Remembrance Lecture in Liverpool this year, as part of National Museums Liverpool’s plans for the city’s sixteenth annual Slavery Remembrance Day.

The three-day programme has been taking place in the city since 1999 with the main day of activity on Slavery Remembrance Day itself, Sunday 23 August.  As well as remembering those lost through the transatlantic slave trade, Slavery Remembrance Day also reminds us of the threat of racism and discrimination in modern society. 

Continuing to keep Mandela on the world’s mind, Ndaba fuels the fiery message that one person can make a difference. He was recently named one of the ‘28 Men of Change’ by Black Entertainment Television.

He will deliver the Dorothy Kuya Slavery Remembrance Lecture on Friday 21 August at the Dr Martin Luther King Jr building at Albert Dock, Liverpool, before opening a special literary event ‘Poets Against Apartheid – The Legacy of Gil Scott-Heron’ in the same venue on 23 August, after leading the International Slavery Museum’s annual ‘Walk of Remembrance’.

Having been invited by Liverpool poet and event producer Malik Al Nasir of Yesternight Productions, Ndaba will present a series of events in the city including the UNESCO Slavery Remembrance Day commemorations and Liverpool International Music Festival’s commissioned event ‘The Revolution Will Be Live’ at St. George’s Hall.

The city will play host to Mr Mandela in a week that will see him jointly visiting the Directors of the Nelson Mandela Memorial Campaign Group - who are working with the city to develop a permanent memorial to Ndaba's grandfather the late Nelson Mandela - and the Tiber Young People’s Steering Group at the Greenhouse Multi-Cultural Play and Arts Project in Toxteth.

As the Founder and Chairman of the Africa Rising Foundation, Ndaba has a vision to encourage young Africans to empower themselves to be at the forefront of Africa’s development. He is co-founder and Executive Director of MM Afrique Investments and Founder of the Mandela Project.

Ndaba Mandela said:

“I was happy to accept Malik’s invitation on behalf of the International Slavery Museum and Culture Liverpool. It’s truly an honour to be asked to deliver this lecture in Liverpool as part of Slavery Remembrance Day, and follow in the footsteps of such inspirational people as Amma Asante and Mr Martin Luther King III.

As the home of the International Slavery Museum, I am very much looking forward to visiting the city as I have heard great things about the work that’s being done to educate the world on the history of slavery and its continued existence in modern society, with particular reference to the Apartheid system in South Africa. 

My vision is to inspire a new demographic of young Africans that will empower themselves to be at the forefront of Africa's development. Liverpool has a critical part to play in that, in terms of the city's history, its community and future, and I look forward to sharing that vision with the Nelson Mandela Memorial Campaign Group and Toxteth's Tiber Young People's Steering Group, and to see if we can share any ideas and good practice with them as well.”

Claire Benjamin, Deputy Director, Education and Visitors at National Museums Liverpool, said:

“We are privileged to welcome Ndaba Mandela to the International Slavery Museum, to be part of such an important event in the city's cultural calendar. “Ndaba will deliver a truly inspiring lecture this year, touching many through his family connection and continuation of Nelson Mandela’s legacy. We also hope the people of Liverpool will join us for the Walk of Remembrance which takes place through the city centre on Sunday 23 August.”

Slavery Remembrance Day is organised by National Museums Liverpool in partnership with Liverpool City Council.

Events include: 

• Friday 21 August: Dorothy Kuya Slavery Remembrance Lecture by Ndaba Mandela at the Dr Martin Luther King Jnr building, Albert Dock. Sense of Sound will open this year’s event with a choir performance. Doors open at 5pm and the lecture will start at 6pm. Tickets are free but booking is essential for this free event. Booking details to follow shortly at: www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/srd

• Saturday 22 August:  Family events from 1-4pm at the International Slavery Museum

• Sunday 23 August: Walk of Remembrance (starts noon) through Liverpool city centre and Libation ceremony (starts 1pm) at Albert Dock. Everyone is free to join the walk. Following the Libation a variety of events will take place at the International Slavery Museum including commemorative arts and crafts activities.

• Sunday 23 August: Poets Against Apartheid - The Legacy of Gil Scott-Heron, featuring poets Malik Al Nasir, Tayo Aluko and Jean Binta Breeze, with accompaniment of the Nicky Brown Gospel Choir.  

• Details about all Slavery Remembrance Day events: www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/srd

• Further details about Ndaba Mandela’s visit to Liverpool: http://arfoundation.co

Notes to editors:

Slavery Remembrance Day
Slavery Remembrance Day has taken place annually in Liverpool on 23 August since 1999. August 23 is a significant date as it commemorates an uprising of enslaved Africans on the island of Saint-Domingue (modern Haiti) in 1791. Slavery Remembrance Day is organised by National Museums Liverpool in partnership with Liverpool City Council. For the last 15 years people have converged on the Albert Dock to remember those affected by slavery during a traditional Libation ceremony. The Walk of Remembrance has been taking place in Liverpool since 2011.

Ndaba Mandela
• Founder and Chairman of the Africa Rising Foundation
• Co-Founder and Executive Director of MM Afrique Investments
• Founder of  Mandela Project
• Served as a Senior Political Consultant to the Embassy of Japan in South Africa
• Client Liaison Officer of Investec
• Bachelor's degree in Pol. Science and Int. Relations from the University of Pretoria

Nelson Mandela had a “long walk to freedom”, yet his footprints still remain. Following the example of his beloved and iconic grandfather, Ndaba Mandela continues his legacy and fuels the fiery message that one person can make a difference. Ndaba was recently named one of the ‘28 Men of Change’ by BET. He continues to keep Mandela on the world’s mind.

“I carry with me the values of my grandfather. I am an African, and I know what it means to be African, and I’m proud of it.”

Born in Soweto in Johannesburg, Ndaba later moved to Durban where he stayed with the Sisulu family and other relatives. Returning to Johannesburg, he received a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Pretoria in 2008, majoring in Political science and International Relations.

Ndaba joined the Embassy of Japan in Pretoria working as a senior Political Consultant, focused mainly on South Africa. While working at the Embassy he was chosen to represent his country in a business leadership and entrepreneurship programme in Jordan. This three-week annual programme, compiled by the Queen Rania Centre for Entrepreneurship in association with the Ahl Ali Group of Dubai involved participants from Jordan as well as Argentina. He then joined Investec Asset Management getting exposure to their asset management business and business development areas.

Today, he dedicates his time to Africa Rising, the foundation he founded with a vision to create a new breed of young Africans that will empower themselves to be at the forefront of Africa’s development.

He enjoys speaking engagements, talking about the Mandela legacy and motivating people to know more about their origins. By getting involved in community development and being a shining beacon of hope, Ndaba believes people can be the change they want to see.

“Together as one we can accomplish anything” - Ndaba Mandela

In general Ndaba is a man passionate about Africa, its people and concerned about its future.  He has taken the active process of trying to address misconceptions about the country but, more importantly, engage youth and the public on how to start the process of taking control of their destiny now.

On the lighter side of life, he enjoys listening to music and hanging out with friends and family during leisurely time. He believes that one should always keep an open mind and when the opportunity presents itself try something new, because you just might like it.

Dorothy Kuya Slavery Remembrance Lecture
The Dorothy Kuya Slavery Remembrance Lecture is named after a woman described as ‘Liverpool’s greatest fighter against racism’, Dorothy Kuya.

Dorothy Kuya, 80, passed away in 2013. Born in Liverpool 8, Dorothy had an impact far beyond Merseyside becoming one of the country’s leading figures in combating inequality.

Dorothy Kuya was Liverpool’s first Community Relations Officer and became Head of Race Equality for Haringey Council before moving back to Merseyside in 1994. She was part of Granby Residents Association and campaigned against the demolition of homes in the area.

Dorothy was also instrumental in helping set up the International Slavery Museum which opened in 2007 and Slavery Remembrance Day which was first marked in the city in 1999.

Memorial Lectures in recent years have been delivered by civil rights campaigner Mr Martin Luther King III, renowned activist and scholar Dr Maulana Karenga, civil rights campaigner Diane Nash and Zimbabwe’s first Black cricketer Henry Olonga. 

About National Museums Liverpool
National Museums Liverpool comprises eight venues. Our collections are among the most important and varied in Europe and contain everything from Impressionist paintings and rare beetles to a lifejacket from the Titanic. We attract nearly 2.7m visitors every year. Our venues are World Museum, Museum of Liverpool, the Walker Art Gallery, Merseyside Maritime Museum, International Slavery Museum, Border Force National Museum, Sudley House and the Lady Lever Art Gallery.  

International Slavery Museum
The International Slavery Museum opened in August 2007. It is situated on the third floor of the Merseyside Maritime Museum at the Albert Dock. It is the only national museum in the world to cover the transatlantic slave trade and its legacies as well as contemporary forms of slavery and enslavement. It is also an international hub for resources on human rights issues and campaigning. 

Liverpool and the slave trade
Liverpool became the major port for the transatlantic slave trade. Liverpool ships were involved in forcibly transporting as many as 1.5 million enslaved Africans across the Atlantic from 1699 until the British Parliament passed the Act for the Abolition of the Slave Trade in 1807. As a result, much of the city’s wealth in the 18th and 19th centuries came from the profits made by the enslavement of Africans which cemented the foundations for the port’s future growth. In 1999 Liverpool City Council passed a formal motion apologising for the city’s role in the transatlantic slave trade and the enslavement of Africans.