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Sculpture conservation specialists at work

Sculpture conservation specialists at work at the Conservation Centre

Fairy head piece made from the V&A plaster copy

Head piece made from the V&A plaster copy.

Squirrel illustrationConservation - before

The sculpture was cleaned using an infrared laser that works by emitting short pulses of infrared light. This light is quickly absorbed by dirt, pollution, encrustations, corrosion and paint layers, which heat up and come away from the bronze, leaving the surface clean and intact underneath. The infrared laser cleaning is one of the most gentle methods of cleaning for this kind of sculpture.

It had been Frampton's wish that, to prevent inferior reproductions, all original material was to be destroyed after his death. Luckily, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London had plaster copies of the fairy head and Peter Pan's pipes, which were laser scanned to produce resin copies. The missing squirrel cast was taken from Kensington Garden's Peter Pan. The three casts were then sent to the foundry to be reproduced in bronze.

The newly cast pieces were secured with steel fixings and re-welded, the cut marks repaired and a protective barrier applied. The surface was also retouched with paints to enhance the colour of the bronze.

Peter Pan is now ready to return to his rightful place in Sefton Park.

 

Before conservation | During conservation | After conservation


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