Highlights of previous years

Select each of the thumbnails below to see some of the highlights of previous Slavery Remembrance Day events, which have included:

  • Memorial lectures by internationally renowned speakers including Martin Luther King III and Diane Nash in recent years.
  • An annual Walk of Remembrance through the city every year since 2011. In 2013 the walk was led by led by Dr Gee Walker.
Professor Verene Shepherd, a leading Jamaican academic, author and broadcaster, gave the 2013 Slavery Remembrance Day memorial lecture 'Enough done be enough! Women, enslavement and emancipation'. © Simon Webb Dr Gee Walker led the walk of remembrance in 2013. © Simon Webb In 2012 the Walk of Remembrance through Liverpool was led by Mr Martin Luther King III, eldest son of the great Civil Rights leader Dr Martin Luther King Jr. © Simon Webb In 2012 Mr Martin Luther King III, eldest son of the great Civil Rights leader Dr Martin Luther King Jr, gave the memorial lecture 'Fulfilling the dream, idols vs ideals'. © Simon Webb Renowned activist scholar Dr Maulana Karenga addressed the crowd at the end of the 2011 Walk of Remembrance. Some very appropriate earrings, at Slavery Remembrance Day 2011. The first ever Walk of Remembrance was held on Monday 22 August 2011. Cecil Gutzmore, spokesperson for the Haiti First! Haiti Now! Reparations campaign, lecturer at the University of Jamaica, political activist, researcher, writer and pan-africanist, was the first speaker at the Black origins discussion panel in 2011. People at Slavery Remembrance Day 2011 wore their 'We Remember' badges with pride. In 2011 Dr Mark Ledwidge presented an analysis of the historical consequences of enslavement and its impact on the African psyche, and his important message that to heal the wound of enslavement you first have to see it. The walkers at the first Walk of Remembrance in 2011 wore their 'We Remember' badges with pride. Mende Nazer, a speaker at the Black origins discussion panel in 2011, described just what freedom means to her after her experience of being captured and forced to work as a slave for seven years before escaping. The walkers at the first Walk of Remembrance in 2011 wore their 'We Remember' badges with pride. Artist Dread Scott discussed the legacy of slavery in America and a future without exploitation, with examples of his powerful artworks, as part of the 2011 discussion panel. Jill and Maimuna from the African Community Centre in Swansea travelled up from South Wales to attend the Slavery Rememnbrance Day events. The walkers at the first Walk of Remembrance in 2011 wore their 'We Remember' badges with pride. Lots of people gathered to hear Dr Karenga speak at Slavery Remembrance Day 2011. The walkers at the first Walk of Remembrance in 2011 wore their 'We Remember' badges with pride. Reyahn said she took part in the walk In 2010 cricketer Henry Olonga gave the memorial lecture. The first Black cricketer to represent Zimbabwe at international level, Henry wore a black armband at the 2003 Cricket World Cup in protest against Robert Mugabe's government. This led to a warrant for his arrest on charges of treason, which carries the death penalty in Zimbabwe, forcing him to retire from international cricket and temporarily to go into hiding. The 2009 memorial lecture was given by Diane Nash, the US civil rights activist who was instrumental in the birth and development of America's Civil Rights Movement. Her lecture focussed on her life and the legacy of the civil rights struggle in light of Barack Obama's historic election victory. Vikky from the museum's education team, who performs as Diane to teach schools and the public about her, met the real Diane after the lecture. © Simon Webb In 2008 the memorial lecture was given by the British poet, playwright and author, Lemn Sissay. Known for performances of his poetry with jazz fusion groups, Lemn's TV appearances range from 'The South Bank Show' to the BBC's hit series 'Grumpy Old Men', where he is the youngest contributor. © Simon Webb The International Slavery Museum opened on Slavery Remembrance Day 2007. One of the first visitors was Reverend Jesse Jackson, shown here with Dr David Fleming, Director of National Museums Liverpool, and Dr Richard Benjamin, the head of the International Slavery Museum. The memorial lecture in 2007 was 'The ideological origins of chattel slavery in the British world' by Dr Molefi Kete Asante, a distinguished author and professor in the department of African-American Studies at Temple University, USA. © Simon Webb In 2006 Ekow Eshun, writer, broadcaster and the Artistic Director of the Institute of Contemporary Art, gave the Slavery Remembrance Day memorial lecture, focusing on his book 'Black Gold of the Sun', and the legacy of slavery through contemporary art and culture. In 2005 Chief Angus Chukuemaka gave a libation, or offering of atonement, as part of a ceremony given in both English and Swahili. © Mealeys photography Cathy Tyson compered the 2004 events. The United Nations marked 2004 for 'commemoration of the struggle against slavery and its abolition'. That year was also the tenth anniversary of non-racial democracy in South Africa.