Thomas Goff Lupton

English mezzotint engraver (1791 - 1873) of landscapes, topographical views and portraits

Thomas Goff Lupton was the son of a goldsmith in Clerkenwell, London. He was apprenticed to the painter and engraver George Clint (1770 - 1854) in 1805 and worked with the engraver Samuel William Reynolds (1773 - 1835).

Lupton struggled to make a profit engraving on copper plates, which were unable to produce a sufficient number of impressions. Expanding on an idea conceived by William Say (1773 - 1835), Lupton experimented with soft steel as a plate material in order to find something more durable. He subsequently began engraving steel plates which produced many more impressions. In 1822 he received the gold 'Isis' medal from the Society of Arts as an acknowledgment of his contribution to the process of mezzotint engraving.

He continued to engrave in both steel and copper, producing some notable plates after Sir Thomas Lawrence (1769 - 1830), Sir Martin Archer Shee (1769 - 1850) and Thomas Philips (1770 – 1845). He also produced a number of plates after Joseph Mallord William Turner's (1775 - 1851) 'Liber Studiorum'.
  • Gender
    Male
  • Relationship
    Artist/maker, Engraver
  • Nationality
    British: English
  • Born
    03 September 1791
  • Place of birth
    Europe: Northern Europe: UK; Europe: Northern Europe: UK: England: London
  • Died
    18 May 1873
  • Place of death
    Europe: Northern Europe: UK; Europe: Northern Europe: UK: England: London
  • Cause of death
    Unknown or unrecorded
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