Jury for John Moores 2012

George Shaw

George Shaw

Photo: Dan Wooton

George Shaw was born in 1966 in Coventry and graduated with a MA in painting at the Royal College of Art in London. He is based in Ilfracombe, North Devon. Shaw is noted for his highly detailed almost Photorealist works which celebrate the mundane suburban landscape, working from photographs taken of and around his childhood home on the Tile Hill Estate, Coventry. Shaw was nominated for the Turner Prize 2011 for this show.

Iwona Blazwick

Iwona Blazwick

Iwona Blazwick OBE, Director, Whitechapel Gallery

Iwona Blazwick lives and works in London, where she has been Director of the Whitechapel Art Gallery since 2001. A writer, curator and broadcaster, she was Director of Exhibitions at London's Institute of Contemporary Art from 1987 until 1992. Iwona Blazwick has been a judge for the Turner Prize (1993), the Jerwood Prize (1997), Citigroup Photography Prize (2001), Paul Hamlyn Awards (2002), the Wolf Prize in Arts (2003), The Vincent (2004), The Hiroshima Art Prize (2004), The Clark Prize (2005), The Wolfgang Hahn Prize (2007) and the Venice Biennale Golden Lion Award (2007). She chairs the Jury of the ongoing MaxMara Art Prize for Women.

Alan Yentob

Alan Yentob

Born in 1947, Alan Yentob is the Creative Director of the BBC and Editor and Presenter of the Imagine programme. A celebrated and award-winning programme maker, Alan quickly came to personify the creative spirit of the BBC.

Yentob has been head of music and arts, controller of BBC Two, controller of BBC One, director of programmes and director of drama, entertainment and children's programmes. His outside responsibilities include Chair of the Trustees of the children's charity Kids Company.

Fiona Banner

Fiona Banner

Photo: Mischa Haller

Fiona Banner is an artist who lives and works in London. She was shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 2002 and her installation Harrier and Jaguar was at Tate Britain in 2010. In 2012 she worked with David Kohn architects to realise the Roi des Belges, a one-bedroom building based on the boat that Joseph Conrad captained up the Congo in 1890, a journey echoed in his most famous work 'Heart of Darkness'.

Banner has exhibited widely in Europe and America. Her work is represented in many collections in the UK and abroad. In 2013 she will be the subject of a major mid-career survey at MAC/VAL in Paris. Much of Fiona Banner's work stems from her fascination with the near impossibility of containing action and time in a language. Her practice encompasses sculpture, drawing and publishing.

Books are central to her practice and in 1997 she founded The Vanity Press, through which she has published her own works including 'The Nam' (1997), 'All The World's Fighter Planes' (2004 / 2006), 'The Bastard Word' (2007) and 'ISBN 978-1-907118-99-9' (2010).

Angela de la Cruz

Angela de la Cruz

Photo: Ione Saizar

At first glance, de la Cruz's paintings appear to have been vandalized or flagrantly abused. Mangled stretchers, slashed canvases, twisted and violated, are hung on the wall like macabre trophies, and yet it is this deliberate and systematic desecration of the canvases, which informs the end result. Emotionally raw, yet canny and sharply ironic, de la Cruz confronts the 'problem' with painting by incorporating its very destruction into the work itself. "The moment I cut through the canvas I get rid of the grandiosity of painting".

Angela de la Cruz was born in La Coruña, Spain, in 1965 where she studied philosophy at the University of Santiago de Compostela. In the late eighties she moved to London where she studied at Chelsea College of Art and later at Goldsmiths College and The Slade School of Art. She has exhibited in galleries all over the world including in After, her first solo exhibition in the UK at Camden Arts Centre in April 2010. In May 2010 she was nominated for the Turner Prize. Angela de la Cruz lives and works in London UK