About this object

Ash chest (double) of Aninia Asterio and C. Iulius Speratus. The ash chest has two separate cavities and two inscription panels, seemingly inscribed by the same hand. The decoration is limited on the front only, with the sides worked smooth and the back and the anterior cavities roughly worked. The inscriptions in the framed panels are placed side by side at the front. The left one is
ANINIA ASTERIO
SIBI. ET
FRATRI.SVO. The translation for this is Aninia Asterio for herself and her brother
To the right: C.IVLIVS SPERATVS. The translation is: Caius Iulius Speratus
The formula for the left is unusual and does not name the brother. The occupant of the second cavity was probably a freed man or a freeborn and does not appear to be related to the Anninia Asterio or at least the inscription does not state so.
The style of the two inscriptions is very similar so they could be by the same artist or at least carved around the same time. If the two people mentioned in the inscription were not related it could well be that the second cavity was sold to Speratus.
There is minimal decoration of a broad plain fascia and cyma moulding at the front and in between the two inscription panels which are both framed by the same moulding. The plain decoration is difficult to date.

Object specifics

  • Type
    Religion
  • Culture
    Roman Imperial
  • Artist/Maker
  • Place made
    Europe: Southern Europe: Italy: Rome
  • Date made
    50 AD - 100 AD
  • Materials
    Marble
  • Location
    Item not currently on display
  • Acquisition
    Gift of Col. Joseph W Weld, 1959
  • Collector
    Henry Blundell
  • Place collected
    Europe: Southern Europe: Italy: Rome
  • Date collected
    1789
  • Measurements
    235 mm x 560 mm x 260 mm
  • Note
    The provenance of the ash chest was not known but as Davies commented (2007) that was not a reason to doubt its authenticity. The ash chest is not mentioned in the Monumenta Matthaeiana or the Engravings volume but does appear on the list of the inscriptions exported by Lisandroni and d'Este in 1789. In the Account Blundell described the lid as being decorated with roses, this may be lid No 83, its current lid? and a later restoration and it was probably formed by two gabled lids with a rosette and currently cut in two lids.
  • Related people
    Henry Blundell ( Collector, previous owner); Antonio d'Este ( Previous owner); Ferdinando Lisandroni ( Previous owner); Joseph William Weld ( Previous owner)

Explore related

Publications

  • Ancient Marbles in Great Britain

    Michaelis, A

    Author: Michaelis, A
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Date: 1882
    Description:

  • The Ince Blundell Collection of Classical Sculpture. Volume 2 - The Ash Chests and other Funerary Reliefs

    Davies, Glenys

    Author: Davies, Glenys
    Publisher: Verlag Philipp von Zabern
    Date: 2007
    Description:

Ownership

Previous owners

  • Joseph William Col Sir Weld

    Owned from: 1958
    How acquired: Unknown or unrecorded
    Owned until: 1959
    Disposal method: Unknown or unrecorded
  • Henry Blundell

    Owned from: 1789
    How acquired: Unknown or unrecorded
    Owned until: 1810
    Disposal method: Unknown or unrecorded
  • Ferdinando Lisandroni

    Owned from: Unknown or unrecorded
    How acquired: Unknown or unrecorded
    Owned until: 1789
    Disposal method: Unknown or unrecorded
  • Antonio d'Este

    Owned from: Unknown or unrecorded
    How acquired: Unknown or unrecorded
    Owned until: 1789
    Disposal method: Unknown or unrecorded
Object view = Humanities
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