About this object

Copper gilt statue of Manjushri / Jampalyang, Bodhisattva of Wisdom seated in the lotus position on a double lotus pedestal. He wears the five jewelled crown and ornaments of the Bodhisattva and these are studded with turquoise coloured glass, although some stones are missing. Resting on a lotus stem, behind his left shoulder, is a manuscript and he holds a sword in his upper right hand; both these items represent wisdom. In his lower hands he holds a bow and arrow, a further sign of wisdom.

Object specifics

  • Type
    Religion
  • Culture
    Tibetan
  • Artist/Maker
    Unknown or unrecorded
  • Place made
    Asia: Central Asia: Tibet [China]
  • Date made
    1860 about
  • Materials
    Paste; Gilt Metal; Copper; Pigment
  • Location
    Item not currently on display
  • Acquisition
    From the Collection of Sir Charles Bell
  • Collector
    Charles Alfred Bell
  • Place collected
    Not recorded
  • Date collected
    1913-03-06 before
  • Measurements
    175 mm x 130 mm x 85 mm; 6 7/8 in x 5 1/8 in x 3 3/8 in
  • Note
    List of Curios No 186:
    Per Barmiak Lama on 6th March 1913. Image of four handed Jampeyang called Tsen-jö Jam-pe-yang. The image is of copper gilt, perhaps 50 or 60 years old. It is well-made. In one right hand he holds the "Sword of Knowledge", in one left a lotus stalk on the flower of which rests the "Book of Limitless Knowledge (she-chin). In the other pair of hands he carries the "Bow and Arrow of Knowledge". Round his body are two necklaces.

    Curator's note: Tibet Catalogue 1953 refers to this object as 50.31.63. Bell makes no reference to how this piece was acquired or where it is from.

    Written by Emma Martin
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Publications

  • List of Curios

    Bell, Charles Alfred

    Author: Bell, Charles Alfred
    Publisher:
    Date:
    Description: A typed object catalogue from Bell's handwritten notes on a wide variety of objects from his personal collection. This information often contains, the date he obtained an object, its provenance (including where and who he acquired from) and the person responsible for giving him the information. The process of writing the inventory began in December 1912 and continued until the late 1930s.

  • Tibet: Catalogue of Exhibits

    Tankard, Elaine

    Author: Tankard, Elaine
    Publisher: Liverpool Public Museums
    Date: 1953-03
    Description: Introductory essay and catalogue entries, in themes, for the 1953 exhibition; 'Tibet', held at the Walker Art Gallery.

Object view = Humanities
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