About this object

A large copper jug used for beer. It has a gilt makara (mythical sea creature) handle and a gilt, four-sided spout. The body of the jug is braced with a square grid of gilt bands and the upturned apron-shaped rim is decorated with gilt club-shaped details. Its is decorated on either side of the spout with scalloped medallions worked in gilt, two show the kirtimukha or 'face of glory' and one shows a deer. There are two gilt bosses, attached with copper pins, for holding a strap or chain.

Object specifics

  • Type
  • Culture
  • Artist/Maker
    Unknown or unrecorded
  • Place made
    Asia: Central Asia: Tibet [China]: Ü-Tsang
  • Date made
    Late 19th Century
  • Materials
    Copper; Gilt Metal
  • Location
    Item not currently on display
  • Acquisition
    From the Collection of Sir Charles Bell
  • Collector
    Charles Alfred Bell
  • Place collected
    Asia: Central Asia: Tibet [China]: Ü-Tsang: Gyantse
  • Date collected
  • Measurements
    345 mm x 400 mm x 220 mm; 13 9/16 in x 15 3/4 in x 8 11/16 in
  • Note
    Lists of Curios No 278:
    Given to me by Doring Techi Kusho. Used for beer etc.

    Curator's note: Probably given in 1917, during annual trip to Gyantse. This was given by Doring Kusho's son who would become a leading lay official in Tibet and would be one of two special envoys to the Panchen Lama to discuss his return and to hopefully escort him back to Tashi Lhunpo in 1936.

    Written by Emma Martin
  • Related people
    Charles Alfred Bell (Collector)

Where is this object from?

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  • List of Curios

    Bell, Charles Alfred

    Author: Bell, Charles Alfred
    Description: A typed object catalogue from Bell's handwritten notes on a wide variety of objects from his personal collection. This information often contains, the date he obtained an object, its provenance (including where and who he acquired from) and the person responsible for giving him the information. The process of writing the inventory began in December 1912 and continued until the late 1930s.

Object view = Humanities
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