About this object

A bandolier made from a leather strap with seven iron powder flasks, a strike-a-light decorated with leather and iron floral motifs, a square leather pouch containing a steatite bullet mould are all appended from rope, leather straps and metal loops. A further leather strap is broken and it appears this would have held a powder horn that has a wooden stopper.

Object specifics

  • Type
  • Culture
  • Artist/Maker
    Unknown or unrecorded
  • Place made
    Asia: Central Asia: Tibet [China]: Ü-Tsang
  • Date made
    19th Century
  • Materials
    Skin Leather; Horn Animal; Steel; Wood; Rope; Steatite
  • Location
    Item not currently on display
  • Acquisition
    From the Collection of Sergeant J Heaney
  • Collector
    J Heaney
  • Place collected
    Asia: Central Asia: Tibet [China]: Ü-Tsang: Guru
  • Date collected
    31st March 1904
  • Measurements
    1386 mm x 345 mm x 42 mm; 54 9/16 in x 13 9/16 in x 1 5/8 in
  • Note
    Curator's note: When J Heaney sold this and other items to Liverpool Museum in 1905, he also noted the individual object's site of 'collection'. Guru was the site of intense fighting during the Younghusband puntive expedition and many Tibetans were killed here. It is likely that this bandolier was taken as a trophy / souvenir from a dead Tibetan soldier. Written by Emma Martin.
  • Related people
    J Heaney (Collector)

Where is this object from?

Explore related


  • Tibet: Catalogue of Exhibits

    Tankard, Elaine

    Author: Tankard, Elaine
    Publisher: Liverpool Public Museums
    Date: 1953-03
    Description: Introductory essay and catalogue entries, in themes, for the 1953 exhibition; 'Tibet', held at the Walker Art Gallery.


  • Mission to Lhasa 1903-1904

    Start date: 1903
    End date: 1903
    Description: The British Mission to Tibet during 1903 and 1904 was an invasion of southern Tibet by British Indian forces on the pretence of negotiating trade relations between Tibet and British India. However, this was instigated primarily in the hope of preventing the Russian Empire from interfering in Tibetan affairs and thus gaining a base in one of the buffer states surrounding British India. The expedition was led by Colonel (later Sir) Francis Younghusband. It had a damaging effect on the British reputation, many Tibetans were killed and monasteries and houses were looted and/or destroyed along the way. The 13th Dalai Lama feld Lhasa before the arrival of the expedition and Younghusband negotiated, a soon to be repelled, convention with the Tibetan government or Kashag in Lhasa that was signed in the Potala on 7 Septmber 1904.

Object view = Humanities
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