Shabti of Padi-Isis

M13871

On display

Green glaze faience shabti in the form of a mummy inscribed for Padi-Isis. He wears a striated tripartite wig and a plaited divine beard. The arms are crossed right over left on the chest, and the hands emerge from a shroud to hold hoe in the left, and a pick in the right. The implements are very well modelled in relief. The hoe has a twisted wiry tie. The right hand also holds the twisted rope rope of a well defined, round bottomed basket that is suspended behind the left shoulder. The head of the shabti leans slightly to the left, and although the nose is a little rubbed, the face is finely modelled. The eyes are almond–shaped with cosmetic lines in relief. The eye brows are also rendered in relief. The shabti stands against a dorsal pillar, and upon a trapezoidal base. Nine horizontal bands of hieroglyphic text give the name of the owner, Padi-Isis (Pa-dj-Aset), and his mother, Asetempemose (Ast-m-p-ms), followed by Chapter 6 of the Book of the Dead. Translation of the inscription: The Osiris, Pa–di–Aset, justified, born to Iset–em–per–mest, justified, he speaks: O, these shabtis, if one counts, the Osiris, Pa–di–Isis, justified, born to Iset–em–per–mest, justified, to do all the works that are to be done in the realm of the dead – now indeed obstacles are implanted therewith – as a man at his duties, ‘here I am,’ you shall say when you are counted off at any time to serve, to ferry sand, to cultivate the fields. There are three other shabtis for ther same owner in the British Museum (EA 8966, 8982 and 8981) two of which were acquired from Joseph Sams in 1834, the same source as our example.