Research First World War family history

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Image of boy trying on helmet Our City Soldiers gallery features a range of military headware to try on

Come along to the Museum of Liverpool on Saturday from 10:30am - 4:30pm for a free First World War Family History Event.

There's loads going on, including a trench erected in the Museum's atrium, and an Edwardian School Mistress will also be on hand to teach people about the causes of the First World War. 

Our Family History Events can help you search for relatives who served in the war, and give insight into people's experiences on the Front and at home. This year, the event is more poignant due to the Centenary of the First World War and our new exhibition 'First World War: reflecting on Liverpool's Home Front', which is being displayed to mark 100 years since the outbreak of war.

At the Museum of Liverpool, we look after the collections of The King’s Regiment displayed in the 'City Soldiers' gallery, which features a research database for visitors to use to find out more about family members who served with the King's. The Devereux Database currently contains the biographical details of more than 81,500 men who served in the King's Regiment during the First World War, along with approximately 5,000 images. This year's Family History Event will be particularly special because the compiler of this database will be attending from the U.S.A.

We are also working with local experts and societies to assist visitors' research of soldiers from the area, including:

  • Liverpool Medical Institute
  • Liverpool Medical History Society
  • WO1 (RSM) Bob Dixon from 208 Field Hospital
  • Local King’s Regiment experts
  • The Western Front Association
  • Liverpool and South West Lancashire Family History Society
  • The Liverpool First World War Research Committee
  • The Liverpool Pals
  • The King’s Regiment Association
  • John Moores University

There will be a range of family friendly activities on offer throughout the day including handling sessions, poetry performances and arts and crafts for younger visitors. Visitors can also meet the Museum’s own King’s Regiment ‘Tommy Atkins’ and see what his life in a trench was like, or learn about the embroidered postcards he sent home.