A window of Remembrance

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Photo of First World War window display Catherine Mooney makes the finishing touches to her First World War window display The Museum of Liverpool has teamed up with the Hugh Baird University Centre to create a unique Christmas window display to commemorate the First World War. We tasked first year undergraduates on the Foundation Degree in Visual Merchandising and Promotional Design– validated by the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) – to create a visual display in our shop window to reflect our First World War exhibitions. Students were asked to create designs based on subjects including ‘Home for Christmas’, ‘Women at War’ and ‘The Christmas Truce’. Catherine Mooney was chosen to produce the display which can be seen by visitors until the end of January 2015. Here, Catherine explains the background behind her design proposal: During my research for the Museum of Liverpool's First World War window, I felt it was important to signify the great loss suffered by the city. 13,000 people from Liverpool lost their lives and many more were affected by the war. I obtained a copy of the First World War Memorial Roll of Honour of Liverpool’s Military War Dead, which is displayed in the Hall of Remembrance at Liverpool Town Hall. It lists more than 13,000 names of fallen soldiers. The names are an integral part of my design proposal and are intended to make an emotional connection with the viewer, juxtaposing the sentiment of families at Christmas with the memories of all those who were lost through the tragedy of The Great War. A main element of my design proposal is the use of an army camouflage net as a backdrop. Camouflage netting was first used in the First World War and was made by women to help protect their loved one during battle. Handwritten labels representing each person lost will be tied on with red ribbon, with the aim of evoking the notion of present giving at Christmas time. The names signify those who didn't return home for Christmas and act as a personal remembrance for those who were lost. I have incorporated the Museum's merchandise into my design by developing a Christmas tree idea made from books stacked to form a tree-like shape. The merchandise can be placed on top and used like a plinth to display the stock. I was inspired by the fact it was virtually impossible to obtain a Christmas tree during the war, so people were creative in using whatever materials they could find and 'made do'. Christmas is when families traditionally spend time together and exchange presents. It is also a time to remember those who are no longer with us. My design proposal intends to produce a window that will evoke these feelings and act as remembrance to Liverpool's fallen during the centenary year of the outbreak of the First World War.
Every item purchased in the Museum of Liverpool shop supports National Museums Liverpool, with all profit made going straight back into the organisation. Many Christmas gifts are available, including a First World War selection inspired by the Museum of Liverpool's current exhibitions.